5 Questions with Jasmine Crowe

Jasmine Crowe is an HBCU alumna who is working to make the world a better place one cause at a time. Jasmine’s goal is to foster change and create awareness about the leading socioeconomic issues and challenges of today, like poverty, education, and hunger. She has hosted activations in more than 20 U.S. cities as well as in the U.K. and Haiti. She has collected and donated over 2 million items to causes worldwide and fed over 80,000 people through the Sunday Soul Homeless feeding initiative.

Through her years of work feeding vulnerable populations, she saw a great opportunity for technology to solve a real problem: hunger. In January of 2017, she created Goodr, a tech enabled sustainable food waste management company with a goal to eliminate hunger and reduce food waste. Under Jasmine’s direction, Goodr has now diverted over one million pounds of food from landfill and serves clients including Atlanta’s Hartsfield Jackson Airport, NFL, The Georgia World Congress Center, MetLife, and more. The company completed the Techstars Anywhere Accelerator in 2018.

01. What’s one lesson you would share with your younger self?

Keep going. Too often bad days make us quit, but if we keep going good things and better days are coming.

02. What exceptional person has made a difference in your life—and how?

I would of course have to say my mom. I watched her work full time and put herself through her undergrad and master’s program while raising two daughters. She helped me to see the value of rigor and tenacity in the pursuit of your dreams.

03. What advice would you give to other founders who share your situation or background?

Pave the way. It’s hard being a founder of color, raising money as a woman of color, leading a company, selling you-name-it. But be driven by the fact that you can pave the way for others and that your success will open up more doors and shatter preconceived notions.

04. What drives you?

I want to end hunger. I am driven by the fact that 40 million people in the U.S. don’t know where their next meal is coming from, and I can change this.

05. What makes you YOU?

Proud Black Woman








5 Questions with Rachel McCrickard

Rachel McCrickard is the Founder & CEO of Motivo, the largest platform for therapist telesupervision. As a licensed marriage and family therapist (LMFT), Rachel experienced firsthand just how difficult it is for a pre-licensed therapist to find the right clinical supervisor and collect the hours needed for licensure—a requirement for practicing in any state in the U.S. That’s why she founded Motivo, the first HIPAA-compliant live video platform connecting pre-licensed mental health professionals to clinical supervisors. The company completed the Techstars Atlanta program, in partnership with Cox Enterprises, in 2018.

Founded in Chattanooga, Rachel launched Motivo in The Company Lab (CO.LAB) where she won CHA’s Startup of the Year. Rachel was then accepted into Techstars Atlanta’s 2018 cohort, so she and her husband, Warren, sold their home and relocated to Atlanta. In 2019, Rachel was named to Atlanta Inno’s 50 on Fire list, and Forbes 50 Women-Led Startups That Are Crushing Tech. Following Motivo’s graduation from Techstars, the company relocated to the Atlanta Tech Village where Rachel is currently raising Motivo’s seed round of funding, led by Cox Enterprises. Follow her on social media @RachMcCrickard @WeAreMotivo.

01. What’s one lesson you would share with your younger self?

In the past, I’ve often been consumed with the fear of failure. I wanted so much to succeed at everything I did, and I would shy away from opportunities that I thought might lead to failure.

Recently, I came across the saying, “What would you attempt to do if you knew you could not fail?” and it was transformative for me. I began to visualize myself succeeding at Motivo. Before any big pitch or important phone call, I play it out going really well in my mind first, and then I step onto the stage believing that I will be successful.

This change in mindset is so powerful. It’s a lesson that I would love to share with my younger self.

02. What exceptional person has made a difference in your life—and how?

Julia Pimsleur, author of Million Dollar Women, has been instrumental in my entrepreneurial journey. When I started my company, I lived in a small Southern city where local women entrepreneurs were hard to come by. Julia, a successful entrepreneur herself as the Founder/CEO of LittlePim, provided me with a wealth of wisdom and guidance through her book. She helped me establish a foundational understanding of fundraising, gave me a crash course in business basics, and provided insight on how to build a solid team. In 2018, I attended her two-day Million Dollar Women Summit in New York where I met several women who became mentors and investors in Motivo. Her book is a constant reminder to me that learning and knowledge are always within my reach, no matter where I live.

03. What advice would you give to other founders who share your situation or background?

What I’ve learned about entrepreneurship is that there are two different ways that people create tech startups. The founders either have a technical background and the expertise needed to build an app or they have domain expertise and see a solution to a problem, but lack the technical knowledge.

I was the second type. I didn’t have any technical experience, but I knew that I had a solution to a really important problem that a lot of people face. So, I tried to figure it out on my own by cobbling together an MVP (minimum viable product) for Motivo’s first platform using Shopify and Zoom. I just wanted to see if anyone would actually use it. We started to get our first customers this way, and it gave us the confidence to begin building something of our own.

My advice? There are a lot of things not in your control, but there are many more things that are in your power. Pull from the grit and determination inside of you to figure out the next step. Whether that be creating an MVP from scratch, devouring books/podcasts to learn, or applying for an accelerator—do everything you can to push yourself and your business to the next level.

04. What drives you?

This is such an important question. It was certainly a pivotal question when I decided to start my company, but it is perhaps even more important today as I’m faced with difficult decisions about how to grow and scale Motivo. I’ve found that this is the question that I come back to when I’m uncertain about my next step. What drives me is the conviction that Motivo can have a direct impact on the accessibility of mental health providers in rural areas. The problem we solve reduces the bottleneck therapists experience when entering the field. So many therapists obtain their degree but never finish the supervision hours needed for licensure. Solving this problem, by making supervision hours more accessible and affordable to all, is what I believe I was born to do. My “why” helps crystalize the answer when I’m faced with hard decisions.

05. What makes you YOU?

People often ask me if I miss being a full-time therapist, now that I’m an entrepreneur. The truth is, I don’t. The reason? I still get to utilize all of my therapy skills every day in my role as Motivo’s CEO. I often tell new therapists that they will likely never regret having obtained a masters degree in counseling, as the skills that every therapist learns stays with them no matter where their journey goes. During my training, I developed emotional intelligence, empathic listening skills, and unconditional positive regard for others, and these are the very qualities that help me build and lead my team today. My take away? No matter who you are or what your journey has been, you have an opportunity to funnel your life learnings into the fabric of your company.








Connecting Women VCs: Building Community and a Better Future

Female investors have always kept discreet lists of other women angels and VCs. We circulate local lists amongst us, created Google spreadsheets and Whatsapp groups in an effort to create community, share deals, and support each other in a male-dominated industry. 

“Our mission with the global directory of women in VC is to give women around the world the tools to better find each other, connect, and collaborate.” —Jessica Peltz-Zatulove

These efforts have been effective—but fragmented and mostly very localized. For this reason, I was particularly excited when Jessica Peltz-Zatulove and Sutian Dong started the Women in VC community several years ago and catalyzed it this year with a searchable database and Slack group. The Global Women in VC Directory now includes 1700+ women investors—at institutional funds, CVCs, family offices, and impact funds—across 1,000+ funds in 46 countries and 110+ cities globally. More than 50% of all women in the VC ecosystem are part of the community.

At Techstars, we share many of the same objectives as Women in VC, including a desire to connect founders to a diverse set of mentors and investors. So today we are excited to announce that Techstars and Women in VC have partnered to grow the number of women mentors across the Techstars ecosystem!

“Our mission with the global directory of women in VC is to give women around the world the tools to better find each other, connect, and collaborate,” said Jessica Peltz-Zatulove, co-creator of the Women in VC directory and Partner at MDC Ventures. “We believe creating a community-based support system is necessary to set more women up for success; it’s not only about actively recruiting more women investors, it’s about keeping the ones we have in the industry—part of that is helping to elevate their voices within their local communities. We’re thrilled to be partnering with Techstars globally to support their mission of diversity and inclusion.”

I’ve been an avid user of the Women in VC Slack community since the launch and have connected with dozens of female investors from London to Singapore, Chicago to LA. Increasing access to other women investors means that I can share deals with them and get them involved with the founders that we work with. 

“We believe creating a community-based support system is necessary to set more women up for success.” —Jessica Peltz-Zatulove

Techstars Includes is our initiative to increase diversity and inclusion in the Techstars Network and entrepreneurship communities. This partnership is intended to leverage the Women in VC community to invite and recruit more female investors to join the Techstars mentor network, working toward our continued commitment to diversity and inclusion. 

Techstars is committed to developing and supporting underrepresented entrepreneurs by fostering an inclusive Techstars Network. For the initial roll out, we will focus on New York, Los Angeles, London, Singapore, Detroit, Atlanta, Seattle, Boston, Denver/Boulder, Berlin, and Austin. Women in VC will also be a part of the Techstars Affiliate Program—an opportunity for any global Women in VC member to refer founders to any Techstars mentorship-driven accelerator program and fast-track their application process.








I Can Enjoy Parenthood Without Losing My Career

By Kristel Kruustük, founder of Testio, Techstars Class 30 at Techstars Austin

Before my son was born, I thought for sure that I would be the type of mom that can’t wait to get back to work. I wanted to plan 2018 so that the office wouldn’t even notice I’d be away. But I was lucky that my diverse group of colleagues ignored my enthusiasm and constantly reminded me to see how things would evolve once the baby was born. It was all the support a mom-to-be could want and I really thank them for that.

We welcomed a healthy baby into our family on one of the coldest weeks of February. And the plan I had projected in my head went completely out of the window.

Being thrust into this new role of a “mom” really changed my perspective on a lot of things — one of them was the way I pursue my career and work life. I realized that I can work my entire life, but I have only a few years to enjoy quality time with my newborn. And this time is extremely precious. So why not just take a step back and focus on what’s the most important thing in my life right now — my family. Otherwise, I might wake up with regrets one day because I missed my child growing up. I would rather miss out on some work opportunities now than shortchanging my kid.

My family. August 2018

It made me think, does this make me a worse leader now? Am I not ambitious enough? But I realized, that there’s only one answer to this — who cares, be whoever you are and do whatever you want, what matters the most is that you’re happy.

While I was expecting my son, I was really afraid of missing out on things. And this made me tell myself that I won’t take any time off, as I have to keep pushing on the work front. In the startup world, it can really get to you when you are surrounded by the 24/7 hustle culture — you constantly feel that if you don’t do it, somebody else might take your place, be it within the company or in the industry.

As a founder, I was constantly reminded that I should be doing so much more and there are an infinite number of challenges to tackle and too little time. It was easy to fall into the circle of guilt. But over time, I understood that for most of us, families are an integral part of our lives. I had to find the inner peace necessary to lay the foundation for it to be okay for me to not prioritize work for a bit. Obviously getting to this mindset and inner peace was not easy. Occasionally, I’ve still found myself thinking that I could be doing so much more and I find myself asking whether I’ve ‘earned’ the right to still be considered part of the team.

I actually struggled with the concept of ‘family first and stay-at-home’ for a very long time, but only precisely until the minute I saw my son Aaron for the first time.

And it made me think “why?” Why did I feel that I have to continue working at the same pace? Is it the pressure our society puts on us? It seems that as soon as you’ve decided to stay at home you’re tagged as a ‘lost cause’. There is this pressure that we shouldn’t take any stops on this fast-moving train of life, otherwise we will miss out on opportunities.

I recently stumbled upon an article about mandatory paternity leave that outlined a 2018 Deloitte survey:

Of more than 1,000 men found that a third worried that taking a leave would hurt their careers, and more than half feared it would signal that they weren’t serious about their jobs.

This is just ridiculous. No one should be afraid to take a paternity or maternity leave. Having a family should not affect our ability to continue our careers. But unfortunately, we also see report after report on how women after giving birth to their first, second, etc. child, lose even more on their salaries while working full-time. Having children is almost like a “handicap” basically. But for dads, as I wrote in my previous post, becoming a parent gives them plus points and increases their likelihood of getting promotions and bonuses.

Based on all the daunting statistics, I asked myself the question — How can I possibly enjoy my time as a mom and still be there for my company and my team? And to be honest, I haven’t found a magic formula. However, I’ve come to this one conclusion:

Be confident in doing what makes you most happy

Happiness opens up so many more opportunities in life. Be happy and confident about your choice of choosing parenthood. If you have decided to give parenthood a go, it will certainly give you a confidence boost as well, at least that’s what it did for me. I realized that I should lead my life to its fullest potential and it’s up to me to define how it will look like.

I realize you might think that as a founder, I’m in a different situation than my team members or other parents out there, but truly, I’m not. At least not in Testlio. We all share the same burden of responsibility and we all try to balance family lives, whichever form they may take. My priority is still making my team and company a success as well.

We feel threatened and scared because of how society has been built up. We are ruled by strong stereotypes but by now it should be clear that stereotypes are meant for breaking. I can assure you that an awesome team member is always welcomed back. No matter how many years they’ve been gone. My sister has been home for three years now with her kids and her colleagues are still eagerly waiting for her return.

I believe being a parent makes you a better person. So be awesome and talk about how awesome being a parent is. Parental leave should definitely be encouraged and supported — this time is like no other. It will teach you things that no amount of money can buy.

But we won’t see a change unless we ourselves act on it, right? So, let’s continue to speak about it and eventually, I hope, we’ll see things change!

Presenting. November 2017

To conclude, I sincerely believe that taking a break such as a maternity or paternity leave to enjoy new life experiences won’t make you ‘miss out’ on anything. Rather, once you’re ready to catch the next train, you will have even more skills under your belt.

Being at home with my son has been the second best time in my life besides just working side by side with my dear team at Testlio. For the first few months, I put everything aside and unplugged myself almost completely out of work. The well-being of my son and giving him comfort/safety in this new world was my number one priority. In all my life thus far, I have never felt this way and I’ve cherished every moment.

***

Is this a time in your life when you’re 100% dedicated to your startup? Apply to a Techstars mentorship-driven accelerator to #domorefaster.

***

Originally published on www.medium.com.








Editions Month Spotlight: Startup Weekend Women

Editions Month is an initiative to highlight and introduce different audiences and industries to the innovation that happens at Startup Weekend. These special events bring together entrepreneurs and industry experts for all kinds of new projects, teamwork, and community building.
 
One of the most popular editions of Startup Weekend we see is Women’s Edition. Startup Weekend Women events seek to flip the ratio from traditional events. They encourage more participation from women and highlight female entrepreneurs all weekend – from the coaches to the judges.
 
Why are these events so critical to building strong startup communities? Because to grow diversity in technology entrepreneurship worldwide, showcasing the talents of women in entrepreneurship is a first step. Organizations around the world are seeking to do this is many helpful ways. The Techstars Foundation recently announced the first round of grantees, you can learn more here about these great organizations that are working to increase diversity and inclusiveness in entrepreneurship.
 
Check out the Women’s Editions happening during Editions Month!

Phnom Penh, Cambodia

León, Mexico

Albuquerque, USA

 

To help build a diverse and strong startup community in your city, sign up to organize Startup Weekend Women!








MEET the Judge

Ida Nerbø shares this advise with Startup Weekend participants:
“Work hard, have fun and be a team player. Everything else we can fix.”
Judge_IdaNerbo








Where Are All The Women Entrepreneurs?

swlex-women-2014

tl;dr – special SW Lex promo code for women!

Melissa Chipman recently wrote an excellent article on the upcoming Kentucky Entrepreneur Hall of Fame (EHoF) induction ceremony, another event happening during Global Entrepreneurship Week. After highlighting the five Kentucky entrepreneurs who will be inducted this year, she pointed out some interesting statistics about EHoF inductees: “It’s worth noting there is only one woman in the Hall of Fame — iPay Technologies’ Dana Bowers — and there are 29 men. There also is only one person of color.”

When you’re the only one of something in the room (as Melissa was the only woman at SW Lou in 2012), it can feel kind of awkward. You may ask yourself questions like, “Am I supposed to be here?” or “Am I good enough for this?”. As Melissa’s team went on to win SW Louisville in 2012, the answers to those questions became quite apparent: the Y chromosome is not the carrier of some magical entrepreneur gene. Melissa has been an outspoken champion for improving diversity of age, gender, and race in Kentucky’s startup communities ever since. With this article she highlights that while times are changing, the EHoF’s recognition of historical achievements noticeably lags behind the present.

So, how about some self-assessment on diversity in our Kentucky startup scene? If we use EHoF inductees as a dataset, we’re not as bad at diversity as local university presidents. But it does seem odd that for a state with demographics of 50.8% women, we only have 4% women in the EHoF (25% for Emerging Entrepreneurs, a more current category). Our numbers aren’t quite as far off when it comes to people of color, as Kentucky is only 12% non-white and EHoF inductees are 4% non-white (10% for Emerging Entrepreneurs). Since it takes a while to grow a large company (and to make a cultural change), we don’t expect any sudden changes in these demographic numbers for Hall of Fame inductees, but we do expect the Emerging Entrepreneurs category (showcasing success-in-progress) to more accurately reflect the diversity of Kentucky’s population.

The Kentucky Entrepreneur Hall of Fame states that, “Our mission is to raise awareness of the impact that entrepreneurship has made in the Commonwealth and encourage others to pursue similar ambitious endeavors.” I think it’s doing a good job with Part 1, showcasing that successful entrepreneurs are not all from California or New York, but are Kentuckians just like all of us. Yet for Part 2 of the mission statement, Melissa’s note reminds us that people are often more inspired by stories similar to their own. I’m more inspired by Ralph G. Anderson, a UK Engineering grad like myself, than by Mark Zuckerberg (who kinda went to Harvard for a while).

We can’t change Kentucky’s past, but we can change our future. To help do this in one small way, we’re offering a special scholarship rate to women for Startup Weekend Lexington 2015. Enter promo code women2 to save 50% off registration, and bring your crazy startup ideas, exquisite design sense, and elite hacker skills with you for the Nov. 20th – 22nd event!








Join the league of extraordinary women at Startup Weekend Dublin

Diversity and inclusion is something we take seriously at Startup Weekend and with every edition we try to come up with ways to inspire a good representation of different groups to come experience a world of technology, innovation, and entrepreneurship.

Perhaps these 3 women will further inspire you to get in on the action as they did as participants, organizers and leaders in a short space of time:

Iliya
Masha on the far right with the rest of Gift Me team at Startup Weekend

Masha Ilina says:

I went to a Startup weekend for the first time in November 2014. I wanted to get to know Dublin’s startup community which this event is perfect for! I was surprised by the quality of mentors and the amount of help you get.

One of the most empowering things for me was to really realize that no idea is a stupid idea and to go and pitch it in front of people. It’s execution really that matters and you have a pool of talent there to work on this idea with for the next 54 hours.

I learned a big deal about group dynamics there. It wasn’t easy to lead a team you barely know! And of course it opened up lots of opportunities for me.

Masha went on to lead her team to win the 1st prize at the November 2014 edition of Startup Weekend with Gift Me – an app that allows you get the perfect gift for a friend as well as crowdfund for it. She also currently on the organizing team for July 2015 edition.

 

Aimee
Aimee on the left (sitting) with MedXNote at the Startup Weekend

Aimee Clancy says:

My team Medxnote winning Start-up weekend 2013 was my first experience of Start-up Weekend. Before this I didn’t know a UX Designer from a Back End Developer, I had limited experience with technology and no experience in Start-ups. Start-up weekend showed me with entrepreneurial spirit, a good idea and a willingness to learn, regardless of our career history, knowledge or experience we can all connect, inspire and do great things.

After this, my interest in Start-ups gained speed. I once again was part of a winning team – Baffle – in 2014 followed by joined the Start-up weekend organising panel in 2015 and currently I’m involved with leading an innovative tech incubator StartLocal which is supported by FCR Media. I now actively encourage more women to get involved with Startup weekend as the benefits are endless – whether you’re there to learn something new, incorporate innovation into our daily lives or simply just to have a hell of a lot of fun, you won’t be disappointed!

Aimee cannot wait to host you at the July 2015 edition of Startup Weekend, and if there’s one thing I can attest to she’s the best host you can ever ask for.

 

L-R Tracy and Gene Murphy at April 2015 Startup Weekend
L-R Tracy and Gene Murphy at April 2015 Startup Weekend

Tracy Keogh (as told by Nubi Kay)

Tracy’s Startup Weekend story is a very interesting one. She attended in June 2014 as a participant and decided to pitch in the last minute. She went on to win the prize for best pitch as awarded by the Judges for her idea – Insurify – a system to help users better navigate the insurance marketplace. Tracy got so in tune with entrepreneurship and weeks later she decided to go all in, quit her job and co-found Deposify – a deposit management service for landlords and tenants.

By November 2014 she was back at Startup Weekend as a co-organizer and then decided to lead it April 2015. Now that’s impressive, going from participant to leading the Startup Weekend in 3 short weekends.

Tracy is nothing short of a champion in Dublin’s Startup Community, picking up awards, advocating for diversity and inclusion as well as leading initiatives like the IIA and Startup Hiking.


 

I hope these stories do inspire you to lean in. If these women can, then you too can and don’t forget to grab tickets for the July 2015 edition of the Startup Weekend Dublin before they run out.








Why Diversity Always Matters in Startup Weekend

TSW-big-photo-edit

At first, I found it strange that the organizing team of the Triangle event I facilitated on June 12-14 pursued a “trailblazers” edition. Initially I had thought the team wanted to create a diversity-themed event similar to the one I had facilitated in Miami just two weeks prior.

final-cover-swmia
I’m not going to say which event I liked more… but they were certainly different! #Diversity

I learned quickly that the rationale behind that branding had to do with the perception of the world “diversity” as potentially not ideal. The term “Trailblazers” alluded to the multiple pioneers that have come from all walks of life in North Carolina, but not directly to women, people of color, or other underrepresented peoples.

This move honestly troubled me for two reasons:

  • Do people actually feel excluded when an event calls for diversity?

  • Do people not want to be part of an event that prioritizes diversity?

After 10 Startup Weekends as a participant, volunteer, organizer, and facilitator, I’ve come to not only appreciate the diversity of each event – I crave it. The greatest killer of an event is monotony – if it looks and feels the same as it did before, it will lose its luster.

lee-muslim-ladies

My last two events were among the most memorable because they knew a simple fact:

Diversity improves community. Always. 

Below are some key lessons I learned during my time in Raleigh, Durham, and Chapel Hill that weekend.

1. History matters, especially from diverse narratives

We’re all familiar of the most famous narrative of innovation out of North Carolina – the location of the famous Wright Brothers’ historic heavier-than-air flight. The state also has a rich history of innovation from lesser-known figures such as:

Sequoyah – creator of the Cherokee alphabet, which allowed for increase communication between and across Native American peoples.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lunsford Lane – born into slavery and invented a special tobacco that raise enough money to buy his freedom.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mary Beatrice Davidson Kenner – inventor of 35 products and holder of five patents, granted retroactively as she was denied previously for being a black woman.

 

 

 

 

 

 

I felt it was important to tell these stories as well in Durham at the event. Innovation can truly come from anywhere, but it takes a special drive to push it forward.

2. Diversity strengthens communities on the rise

The American Tobacco Campus

I was truly captivated by the beauty and sprawl of the downtown Durham innovation sector. Everything from American Underground to the Iron Yard is all within walking distance, and the community is very familiar and well-integrated.

The old American Underground building.

I can see why the Triangle has been selected for the location of the next UP America Summit in September. It has everything the country could want and so much more!

3. You can have a diverse team of literal professionals

group-org-tsw
Top row: Frank Pollack, Austin Henley, Talib Graves-Manns Middle row: Glenda Clare, Lee Ngo, Ramon Llamas, Corey Harris, Adam Klein Bottom row: Jesica Averhart

In all of my Startup Weekends, I’ve never seen a more impressive, academic, and professional group of people that I did at Triangle Trailblazers. In this photo, I estimate there are at least twelve or thirteen advanced degrees and over one hundred years of professional experience.

I was the lone liability of the group.
I was the lone liability of the group. Also, @DrinkMati is a fantastic sponsor.

Moreover, they ran their even with aplomb. Excellent communication, precision, and consideration for the needs of the community. Great, great work!

4. Diversity is more than just about race or gender

This event was attended by nearly equal parts female and male and predominately people of color, particularly African and Latino American. Also like in the Miami event, the Triangle event brought out another underrepresented group: the differently-abled.

Team KinderWalk working to provide guidance for the visually-impaired in buildings.

Two teams that hoped to aid the visually-impaired worked from start to finish during this competition, with one app – The Blank App – going on to win the AT&T Special Award for Connectability.

It’s great to see Startup Weekend bring out the best of ourselves, regardless of whether it is convenient or profitable.

5. A new owner, but the same mission for diversity

General Announcement

With the recent Techstars acquisition of UP Global, there are many community leaders such as myself who are left with several questions about the future of the organization. While tax incentives and financial strategies are important, I think the preservation of UP Global’s Burning Man-inspired philosophy of “radical inclusion” should be at the forefront of the discussion.

hands-in

To me, prioritizing diversity should be self-evident, and it should not ever be a point of contention.

However, until our communities evolve to that point, we’ll just have to stay vigilant. From the bottom of my heart, I thank the Triangle Trailblazers team for inviting me out to be a part of their special event, and I’ll see everyone in September.

Lee Ngo is a community leader and facilitator based in Pittsburgh, PA.








Hopeful future, diverse Inclusion and uber-cool helmets at #InspireFest2015

Dublin was home for 3 days to all that love technology, innovation, and belong to the diversity and inclusion school of thought. As a community leader I had the opportunity to secure tickets to the #InspireFest2015 and after all said and done I am most excited to have had the chance to sit in that audience and engage with other participants and speakers.

Although my total time spent at the Bord Gais Theatre, venue for this year’s Inspire Fest, was 10 hours it was a really packed conference and here are 5 main takeaways:

 

1. We’ve got a hopeful future in the next generation

With people like Lauren Boyle, Emer Hickey, Ciara Judge, and Laura Browne with initiatives like Cool Steam Kids, Germinaid Innovations, and PowerScout, one can confidently hope for a better future. These young people are not build apps to become the next Facebook but are looking to solve big problems from education (STE[A]M orientation), to ending world hunger, and energy management.

It was also great to see today’s people providing the environment for these young chaps to thrive. From university programs in DCU and Trinity to Anne-Marie Imafidon’s Stemettes, we can begin to hope again because we’re in good hands.

 

2. There are business gains for a diverse inclusion agenda

Perhaps the most profound quote from #InspireFest2015 for me was one from Steve Neff, CTO Fidelity when he said:

Steve showed how inclusion and diversity brings about knowledge and value that a business may have never bargained for. Age, wealth distribution, customers, competitors are also some changes driving need for diversity-driven innovation, not to mention opportunities for entrepreneurs when trying to solve the issue of inclusion e.g. Child carers on demand for working women.

 

3. Fashion and Technology loving up in today’s world

As you’d see in the very short clip below, fashion and technology seem to have a thing going. Intel labs showcased one of its work with duo Turkish designers at the #InspireFest. I got discussing this with a friend after the conference when I said – wouldn’t it be cool for your dress to link up with your watch or phone and tell you as you’re about to leave the house whether your clothes go with the weather.

 

4. The future of work is an interesting one

This is a statement DAQRI‘s co-founder Gaia proved with the showcase of the smart uber-cool helmet known as the 4D. She touched on the current outlook of work today – repetitive, laborious and monotonous. With technology such as 4D, work becomes purposeful, connected, and empowering. DAQRI just opened its European HQ in Dublin with a first hackathon to get the developer community in on the future of work. No doubt things are about to get interesting in this space one can agree things are about to get interesting.

Discussions on the future workplace also took place on the first day at #InspireFest2015. While it’s easy to sense some form of consensus among the panelist that work is to be flexible and virtual, that’s a very interesting debate as Yahoo’s Marisser Mayer is currently pushing the agenda to get everyone back to the office building.

 

5. You should be at #InspireFest2016 because Cindy Gallop said so